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Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis M76.70 726.79

Peroneal tendons 

synonyms: peroneal tendinosis, peroneal tendinopathy

Peroneal Tendon Instability ICD-10

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis ICD-9

  • 726.79 peroneal tendinitis
  • 727.06 (tenosynovitis of foot and ankle)

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History

  • May occur in long distance runners

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Anatomy

  • Most common location for longitudinal tears in the peroneus brevis is at the fibular groove (Sammarco GJ, Foot Ankle 9:163;1989)
  • Superior peroneal retinaculum: primary retaining structure for the perneal tendons. Origin: posterior margin of the distal 1-2cm of the fibula. Travels posteriorly to the lateral calcaneus with extensions into the paratenon of the Achilles tendon. Most commonly avulses from the fibula often with a small fleck of bone.  (Maffuli N, AJSM 2006;34:986).
  • Deficient posterior distal fibular groove may contibute to peroneal instability.  Approximately 25% of people have a flattened or convex peroneal groove.
  • Hindfoot varus alignment is a predisposition to peroneal tendon injury.
  • Os peroneum is a sesamoid bone present in 10% to 20% of people located along the peroneus longus near the peroneal groove of the cuboid. (Sobel M, Foot Ankle Int 1994;15:112)

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Clinical Evaluation

  • Palpable tenderness posterior to the lateral malleolus may be indicative of injury to the peroneal tendons.

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Xray / Diagnositc Tests

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Classification / Treatment

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Associated Injuries / Differential Diagnosis

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Complications

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Follow-up Care

Peroneus Brevis Tendinitis Review References

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