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SLAP Tear Classification

Type I SLAP tear  Type I SLAP tear
  • degenerative superior labrum with fraying along the free margin.
  • Treatment = debridement
 Type I SLAP tear arthroscopic image

 Type I SLAP tear

  • degenerative superior labrum with fraying along the free margin.
  • Treatment = debridement
Type II SLAP Tear picture

Type II SLAP Tear

  • Superior labrum detached from the glenoid medially, leaving the superior glenoid neck uncovered for at least 5mm from the corner of the glenoid.
  • There is a gap between the articular cartilage and the labral attachment to bone. 
  • Can be further subdivided into (A)anterior, (B)posterior, and (C)combined anterior-posterior lesions. 
  • Most common type of SLAP lesion.
  • Treatment = 3 months of physical therapy focusing on strengthening the dynamic stabilizers. 
  • If non-op treatment fails to eliminate symptoms arthroscopic SLAP Repair is indicated: consider Biceps Tenodesis in low demand patients >40 years old.
  • See also Biceps Labral Complex Anatomy.
Type II SLAP Tear arthroscopic image

Type II Anterior-Posterior SLAP tear

  1. Biceps labral complex: Type 2 anterior/posterior tear
  2. Long head of Biceps Tendon
  3. Glenoid face
  4. Humeral Head

See also Biceps Labral Complex Anatomy.

Type III SLAP Tear

Type III SLAP Tear

  • Bucket-handle tear of the superior labrum.
  • Uncommon.
  • Treatment = 3 months of physical therapy focusing on strengthening the dynamic stabilizers. 
  • If non-op treatment fails to eliminate symptoms arthroscopic biceps tenotomy with or without Biceps Tenodesis is indicated. If loose fragment is small consider debridement.
  • See also Biceps Labral Complex Anatomy.
Type IV SLAP Tear

Type IV SLAP Tear

  • Bucket-handle superior labral tear that extends into the biceps tendon.
  • Very uncommon.
  • Treatment = 3 months of physical therapy focusing on strengthening the dynamic stabilizers. 
  • If non-op treatment fails to eliminate symptoms arthroscopic biceps tenotomy with of without Biceps Tenodesis is indicated. Can consider debridement or repair.
  • See also Biceps Labral Complex Anatomy.

 

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