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Quadriceps Contusion S70.10XA 924.00

 
ICD-9 Classification / Treatment
Etiology / Natural History Associated Injuries / DDx
Anatomy Complications
Clinical Evaluation Follow-up Care
Xray / Diagnositc Tests Review References

synonyms:

Quad Contusion ICD-110

 

 

A- initial encounter

D- subsequent encounter

S- sequela

Quad Contusion ICD-9

  •  924.00 Contusion of lower limb: thigh

Quad Contusion Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History

  •  Quadriceps muscle are most often injured by a direct blow.
  • Common in contact sports: football, rugby, hockey

Quad Contusion Anatomy

  •  The quadriceps muscle is a group of four muscles in the front of the thigh.   The quad muscles include the vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and the rectus femoris

Quad Contusion Clinical Evaluation

  •  Tenderness, bruising and pain in the anterior thigh.

Quad Contusion Xray / Diagnositc Tests

  •  Xray indicated if fracture is suspected.  Rarely helpful otherwise.
  • MRI can confirm the injury, but is rarely needed.

Quad Contusion Classification / Treatment

Quad Contusion Associated Injuries / Differential Diagnosis

  • Hamstring Tear
  • Iliopsoas strain

Quad Contusion Complications

  • Stiffness
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Myositis ossificans

Quad Contusion Follow-up Care

  •  Generally there are no long term effects, however some severe quadriceps contusions develop myositis ossificans with knee flexion restrictions and radiographic appearances that simulate malignant tumors.

Quad Contusion Review References


 

 

 

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