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Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome S85.009A 904.4

 

synonyms: PAES, Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome ICD-10

 

A- initial encounter

D- subsequent encounter

S- sequela

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome ICD-9

  • 904.4 Injury to blood vessels of lower extremity; popliteal blood vessels

 

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History

  • A partial or complete occlusion of the popliteal artery as a result of aberrant anatomy in the popliteal fossa. 

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Anatomy

  • Popliteal artery passing medial to the medial head of the gastrocnemius
  • Abnormal origin of the medial head of the gastrocnemius
  • Presence of an accessory band of the medial head of the gastrocnemius
  • Popliteal artery passing deep to the popliteus muscle

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Clinical Evaluation

  • Symptoms include unilateral calf pain during exercise, though bilateral involvement has been reported to occur in as high as 67% of affected patients. 
  • Patients may progess to experience pain at rest. 
  • PAES patients will have diminished dorsalis pedis and/or posterior tibialis pulses on exertion. 
  • Hair loss and pallor are not commonly seen in PAES.

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Xray / Diagnositc Tests

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Classification / Treatment

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Associated Injuries / Differential Diagnosis

  • CECC can be differentiated from PAES by the presence of palpable pulses and elevated compartment pressures. 

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Complications

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Follow-up Care

Popliteal Artery Entrapment Syndrome Review References

  • Touliopolous S, Hershman EB: Lower leg pain: Diagnosis and treatment of compartment syndromes and other pain syndromes of the leg.  Sports Med 1999;27:193-204
  • Rudo ND, Noble HB, Conn J: Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome in athletes. Physician Sports Medicine 1982;10:105-114.

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